Maple Mustard Glazed Pork Tenderloin.

It’s finally getting nice and hot outside, so I wanted to make something we could do on the BBQ. We haven’t had pork in a while, and one of my

Finished Meal

Finished Meal

favourite cuts is the tenderloin–and it’s great on the grill. Only yesterday we had a thunderstorm warning, so I decided to roast it instead. The recipe below was inspire by one I found on http://www.allrecipes.com, for Maple Marinated Pork Tenderloin.

The recipe is simple, and you can follow the link for details. Basically, the marinate consists of maple syrup and dijon mustard with some garlic and salt and pepper to taste. Let the meat marinade for several hours. I let it go overnight, then turned it over in the morning to soak again until I got home from work. Be sure to use some of the marinade to baste it, and definitely be sure to leave it in the fridge.

The recipe above is for the grill, but it’s easily done in the oven as well. Pre-heat the oven to 350° F, and put the meat in a shallow pan. You can drizzle it with some more of the marinade, but it should be discarded or cooked after that; after eight hours of soaking, it’ll be filled with bacteria. Cooking it will kill the bacteria, so if you use “raw” marinade to baste the pork while it’s cooking, make sure you give it long enough to cook. I played it safe and discarded it.

The recipe also called for a glaze, but I decided to make some from scratch instead of reducing and cooking the marinade as suggested. It’s the same recipe as before: maple syrup, then a dollop of mustard, salt and pepper to taste. Only this time, I brought it to a boil and let it boil for about a minute. This reduced the sauce to make it nice and thick. If you draw a line in the pan with a spoon, the glaze should be thick enough that the line stays. Note the picture below: that line was there for several minutes, perfect for a nice thick glaze.

Cook the tenderloin for between 25 and 35 minutes, checking to see when it’s done. It’s pork, so it should be cooked all the way through; you can use a meat thermometer, but we just cut into it. When it’s done, slice it into medallions and drizzle with the glaze–not too much, it’s pretty sweet! We added some roasted veggies and edamame for a complete meal.

The vegetables were easy. I boiled the potatoes and carrots for about two minutes, then drained them. While they were still hot I added a couple tablespoons of butter, and about a tablespoon each of rosemary and fresh dill. Mix it up and put it in the oven when the tenderloin has about ten minutes left. Easy!

As for the Maple Syrup–store bought is fine, but we lie to make our own. It’s incredibly simple.

Just put sugar and water in a pan and bring to a boil–the ratio is always one part water to two parts sugar. Once it boils clear, take it off the burner and add some maple flavouring–or, actually, any kind of flavouring you like. (Use almond extract instead for some tasty syrup for your waffles!) Once it cools, you’ll have a moderately thin syrup; boil it just a tad longer and it’ll thicken easily. Also, if you do equal parts sugar and water and forego the flavouring, you’ll have Sugar Syrup, a perfect sweet addition to any cold, hot or alcoholic drink because it dissolves immediately.

Now, after all that, I should assure you: the dish above looks a whole lot more complicated than it actually was. All of the prep–aside from the initial marinade–was done while the tenderloin cooked, so the meal was on the table in about 40 minutes. Perfect supper for a rainy day!

James

 

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